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UBC SCIENCE CONNECT

News and Events | Issue 4, 2021

Flower

 

Common BC flower is actually an insect-eater

The first new carnivorous plant to be identified by botanists in 20 years is a delicate, pretty white flower from the Pacific Northwest. Triantha occidentalis traps small prey with sticky hairs on its flowering stem, but goes easy on larger bees and butterflies that act as its pollinators.

 

 

Telescope

 

 

UBC launches new options in data, computational sciences

Undergraduate students at UBC Vancouver have two new options to pursue studies in data and computational science this fall with the launch of new minor and first-year cohort programs.

 

Telescope

 

 

Scientists capture most-detailed radio image of Andromeda

Researchers, led by UBC physicist Dr. Sofia Fatigoni, have published a new, detailed radio image of the Andromeda galaxy which will allow them to study the regions of Andromeda where new stars are born.

 

Atmosphere pollution

 

 

From the virtual classroom and back again

A look at how UBC’s learning spaces team got the Vancouver campus ready for the return of students, faculty and staff this fall.

 

 

Book cover

 

Read with UBC Book Club
Join us this October to read Five Little Indians, an award-winning novel about residential school survivors by UBC adjunct professor Michelle Good.
Online

 

 

Apples

 

Apple Festival Turns 30
This year’s apple selection focuses on 15 varieties of UBC Botanical Garden festival favourites. Purchase online and collect your apples.
October 15-17

 

Art

 

Art and Dark Matter
Four artists collaborate with UBC Science researchers to explore the mysteries of dark matter. Online and in-person exhibit.
Opens September 10

 

 

Mik

 

 

The seeds of success

UBC spinoff Tasktop has received an investment injection of $100 million. Mik Kersten (BSc ’99, PhD ‘07), CEO of the Vancouver-based software company, attributes his success to his PhD experience at UBC, and the mentorship of his supervisor, Dr. Gail Murphy.

 

 

seal

 

 

Indigenous Knowledge is helping statisticians better understand a changing Arctic

UBC PhD student Rowenna Gryba’s (BSc ‘01) research pairs Indigenous Knowledge of Iñupiaq seal hunters in Alaska with satellite telemetry, allowing statisticians to better understand a changing Arctic.

 

 

Maisie Morsara

 

 

Volcanism created ‘dead zones’ during the time of the dinosaurs

Ocean warming linked to volcanic activity played a key role in triggering rapid ocean ‘dead zones’ during the Mesozoic Era. The UBC research could help elucidate modern ocean deoxygenation.

 

 

Kudos

  • Professors Alejandro Adem, Curtis Berlinguette and Raymond Ng join over 40 UBC Science researchers elected to the Royal Society of Canada since 2000.
  • Zoologist Dr. Dolph Schluter was awarded the Darwin Medal for his contributions to field of evolutionary biology.
  • NSERC funding of $1.6 million will enable EOAS researcher Dr. Philippe Tortell to launch a CREATE graduate training program in ocean data mobilization.
  • UBC received $22 million from the B.C. Knowledge Development Fund for 24 projects across campus, including research in conservation, new materials and cyber security.
  • Recipients of the 2021 Alumni UBC Achievement Awards include three UBC Science alumni—Dr. Eric Peterson (BSc ‘72, PhD ‘75), Dr. James Watt (BSc ‘62, MD ‘67) and Dr. Jacquelyn J. Cragg (BSc ‘07, MPH ‘11, PhD ‘15).
  • Five UBC Science alumni—Nishal Kumar (BSc ‘15), Albert Kim (BSc ‘18), Mikhaela Torio (BSc ‘20), Bahar Moussavi (BSc ‘20) and Felicia Chan (BSc ‘20)–made BC Business's list of 30 Under 30.
  • UBC Science alumna Eloise Moss (BSc ‘19) received the YWCA Young Woman of Distinction Award for her work providing children with quality information on infection control during COVID-19.

 

Stomach

 

 

Taking your stomach’s temperature

Global warming affects our climate and weather. But can it impact your stomach? UBC microbiologist Dr. Carolina Tropini on how macro-scale factors, such as industrialization or climate change, might modify gut microbiota.

 


 

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